30.3.13

Realizing Developmental Agenda through Empowerment of Youth Potentials


 “Our very survival depends on our ability to stay awake … and to face the challenge of social change.”  - Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr.

The slopes of social participation have been slowly changing. The bureaucratic barriers of politics have been slimmed. The direction of national development is now more decentralized. And the rights of the once unheard are now in the ladder of mainstream attention.

Each of these things symbolizes the political revolution that the youths of today are experiencing. The facet of empowerment now trails to the grassroots of the community, catalyzing the strength of a social agenda by vibrant participation.

Technology: Benchmark in Harnessing Youth Potentials

The advancement of technology earmarks the new generation of transformational youths. The digital age has been a living combat to the accusation that a commoner will always remain unheard. As we continue to cave the path of social innovations, we give voices to people who have an unbiased view of the socio-political landscapes in status quo. Technology abridges youths to be instruments of national development with their fresh ideas and unique innovations. With social media, we engage more people to become more responsive to national issues because we can prop information in the open. 

Corollary to that, we can utilize a rich multimedia content to facilitate awareness programs through websites and graphic creations. That way, we’re harnessing human potentials and talents to educate people about different advocacies. And a perfect example of which is on how Twitter and Facebook can be used to improve transparency in elections.  Through the use of mobile phones and its applications, youths are empowered with rights to protect their votes through facilitated reporting of electoral violations. With more accountability and transparency in governance, we can inadvertently seal a better promise to development through active civil vigilance.


(taken from http://infworm.com/become-a-young-leader)

Participative Youths in Social Innovations

In development, the best way to move forward is to learn from our history.  And it is the history of having a centralized power that hinders us in becoming involved in the process of carving solutions. With the borderless ideas that we have in a more globalized world, we also have a platform of infinite possible solutions to the diverse problems.

And we have more empowered youths in the micro-scale who are taking their own initial steps to improve their communities. We have community projects about liter of lights, flood barriers, artificial coral reefs, awareness programs to handicapped people, and many more. These projects should be profiled by the state and be tied-up with private corporations who are willing to fund these community programs.  In this manner, we empower genuine solutions to problems in grassroots level.

Investment to Youth for Labor Force and Knowledge Production

Scholarships and subsidies to state universities return a promise of national progress.  The state should continue to offer vocational and non-vocational programs for the youths with varying interests. The state’s role is to offer options for the youths to harness and improve their raw talents to be able to contribute to the state in the future. In a way, youths will be developed individually with their fueling desire and passion.

If we open our eyes in seeing what youths can do, we will realize that we’re keying in an eminent social driver who will rule the change to development. If we re-live the youth of the past, awaken the youth of today, and empower the youth of our future, we will live in a community that is more responsive to the global challenge of making development a social culture.  



1.3.13

Strolling in Iloilo


Last February, I found myself strolling in Iloilo City. This was probably my first trip out of guilty pleasure and  it turned out that everything was just worth it. 

The first thing that I could say about Iloilo City is that it has a lot of monuments and ancient churches. I could really say that the city must have gone through some rich history. And I think beyond that, the people love the way they preserve these monuments. This can be shown by how preservation efforts of these areas were also very apparent. 


I love photo walks. I just think that the best images are captured in their most natural angles. This is one of the busiest circles in Iloilo. I remember being here when I was 12 years old and nothing has really changed a lot. 

s

I and my bestfriend Mel went to the Filipino-Chinese street. Since Dinagyang Festival has just ended, the highway was closed to give way to the festivities. It was a perfect opportunity for bikers and people who love walking to take the street freely. During regular days, this highway is labeled as one of the busiest highways of Iloilo City. 




THIS PHOTO WAS TAKEN AT THE ILOILO ESPLANADE

Here is my bestfriend, Mel. We call each other 'Bee'. And I'm always happy to have her around. She's probably one of the most talented people I know. The girl was a band vocalist before and she knows how to play the piano. She's an artist and she draws very well. Indeed she had her painting and poster exhibit in a mall in Bacolod last year. And she's very great at photography, photo and video editing. At the bottom of all these things, she told me to never settle in mediocrity. We were partners in almost all projects in our summer school in US and sometimes, she edits my work and make it excellent. We take crazy vids together, dance and sing together in our cultural performances, as well as talk about crazy stuff in the bus. I think she's someone I can easily relate to. She was the one who told me that excellence is a virtue and we should always strive to be in our best shape for everything.


This is the other side if I take a photo from the cathedral. The photo of the cathedral above was taken just right across this street. Actually, that tower out there is in a dinosaur park. I just didn't take a photo of the dinosaurs because they kinda lost their aesthetic values. 


And then we did our traditional jump shots. 


Everything was fun in Smallville, the party capital of Iloilo City. 
Related Posts Plugin for WordPress, Blogger...